Todays Word: “laryngopharyngeal”

Word: laryngopharyngeal

PRONUNCIATION:

(luh-ring-goh-fuh-RIN-jee-uhl, -juhl)

MEANING:

adjective: Of or relating to the larynx (the part of the throat holding the vocal cords) and pharynx (the part of the throat that leads from the mouth to the esophagus).

ETYMOLOGY:

From Latin larynx, from Greek larynx + Latin pharynx, from Greek pharynx (throat). Earliest documented use: 1872.

NOTES:

If you have heard this term, chances are it was in the context of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), a condition in which the contents of the stomach flow back to the throat.

USAGE:

“Under the heading of laryngopharyngeal disorders we discover that oboists and horn players can be prone to nasal speech, regurgitation of liquids and snorting while playing, all a result of the high pressures they must employ to hit their notes.”
Not Quite So Perilous in the Orchestra Pit; Nelson Mail (New Zealand); Feb 25, 2009.

Explore “laryngopharyngeal” in the Visual Thesaurus.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s